Cavachon – Breed Information Characteristics Temperament Health Grooming and Training


Cavachons are a hybrid breed that is not recognized by any major kennel club. Cavachons are small to medium-sized dogs, weighing between 10 and 30 pounds when fully grown. Cavachons have been bred in the United States since the 1990s and they were originally created to be a crossbreed of Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and Bichon Frise.

Characteristics

Cavachons typically have long curly fur on their head, neck, chest, and legs with short hair elsewhere on their body. Cavachons come in many colors including black, brown, tan/golden retriever mix coloration (known as “sable”), white with patches of other colors (known as “harlequin”), red or copper coat (“Ruby”). Cavachons may also have a “king Charles” type of coat where the fur is slightly wavy and longer.

Temperament

Cavachons are considered to be very friendly, gentle dogs that make great family pets. Cavachons are good with children and tend to be playful and active dogs. They are also known to be very sociable animals and do well when around other pets. Cavachons typically love attention from their owners and will often follow them around the house.

Health Challenges of Cavachon

Cavachons are considered to be one of the healthier hybrid breeds, but they can still inherit some health concerns from their parents.

Cavachons are prone to ear infections: All dogs are susceptible to ear infections, but Cavachons are particularly prone because of their long, floppy ears. It is important to keep your Cavachon’s ears clean and dry and to check them regularly for wax build-up, redness, or infection.

Cavachons can be prone to allergies: Cavachons can develop allergies to a variety of things, including food, dust mites, and pollen. If your Cavachon starts scratching a lot or has watery eyes, he may have allergies. See your veterinarian for treatment.

Cavachons can be prone to pancreatitis: Pancreatitis is a condition that occurs when the pancreas becomes inflamed. Cavachons are particularly prone to it because of their high-fat diet. Signs of pancreatitis include vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, and abdominal pain. If your Cavachon shows any of these symptoms, take him to the veterinarian right away.

Cavachons can be prone to Patellar Luxation: Patellar luxation is a condition in which the kneecap pops out of place. Cavachons are more at risk for this condition than other breeds because of their short legs. If your Cavachon starts having trouble walking or seems to be in pain when he walks, take him to the vet.

Cavachons can be prone to Intervertebral Disc Disease: Intervertebral Disc Disease is a condition in which the discs between the vertebrae become compressed and can cause pain, weakness, or paralysis. Cavachons are more prone to it than other breeds because of their long backs. If your Cavachon starts having trouble walking or seems to be in pain when he walks, take him to the vet.

Cavachons can be prone to Legg-Perthes Disease: Legg-Perthes disease is a condition that affects the hip joint and can lead to arthritis or lameness. Cavachons are more at risk for this disease because of their short legs. If your Cavachon starts having trouble walking or seems to be in pain when he walks, take him to the vet.

Cavachons can be prone to Seizures: Seizures can be caused by a variety of things, including genetics, head injury, and liver or kidney disease. Cavachons are more prone to seizures than other breeds because of their high-fat diet. If your Cavachon has a seizure, take him to the vet immediately.

Cavachons can be prone to Von Willebrand’s Disease: Von Willebrand’s Disease is a blood disorder that affects Cavachons more than other breeds. Symptoms include excessive bleeding, nosebleeds, and bleeding from the gums. If your Cavachon starts bleeding for no apparent reason, take him to the vet.

Cavachons can be prone to congenital heart defects: Congenital heart defects are birth defects of the heart that can cause a dog to die suddenly. Cavachons are more at risk for this condition than other breeds. If you notice that your Cavachon is having trouble breathing or seems to be in pain, take him to the vet right away.

Cavachons can be prone to Hypothyroidism: Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough hormones. Cavachons are more prone to it than other breeds. Symptoms include weight gain, hair loss, and lethargy. If you think your Cavachon may have hypothyroidism, take him to the vet for testing.

Despite these potential health problems, Cavachons are generally a healthy breed and with proper care can live long happy lives. Cavachons are good dogs for first-time dog owners because they are relatively easy to care for and are not as high-maintenance as some other breeds.

Grooming

Cavachons require regular brushing to keep their coat healthy and free of mats. Cavachons should also be bathed only when necessary as over-bathing can strip their natural oils from their fur. Cavachon ears should be checked regularly for wax build-up and cleaned if necessary. Their nails should also be trimmed on a monthly basis.

Training

Cavachons are typically easy to train due to their eagerness to please their owners. Cavachons respond best to positive reinforcement techniques such as treats or praise and typically learn commands quickly. Cavachons can be taught to perform a variety of tricks and make excellent agility dogs.

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